Unwanted freshwater pests like the invasive catfish and hornwort pose a serious threat to our rivers, streams and lakes.

Once in a waterway these pests can spread rapidly and destroy the environmental, recreational and aesthetic values of our waterways.

Find out more on the rules that apply when using the region's waterways and the need to self-certify that your vessel and trailer is free from pest weed and fish when using the region's boat ramps. 

Check, Clean, Dry

check clean dry

If you’re moving between waterways you can help to reduce the spread of freshwater pests by using the 'Check, Clean, Dry' method. Find out how to clean your equipment correctly.

Aquatic Weed Spraying

Te Arawa Lakes Trust are undertaking aquatic weed control operations intermittently from 26 April 2022 until 20 May 2022 in Lake Rotorua, Lake Rotoiti, Lake Tarawera, Lake Ōkataina, Lake Rotomā and Lake Rerewhakaaitu. These aquatic weed control operations will involve use of the herbicide Diquat dibromide. Further details of these control operations including maps of all spraying sites can be found in the Aquatic Weed Control Operational Plan here.

alligator-weed

Alligator weed

Regarded as one of the world’s most damaging weeds as it can thrive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments.

Catfish (Brown bullhead)

Catfish (Brown bullhead)

Catfish can survive out of water for up to 48 hours, making them even more capable of invading new waterways.

Egeria

Egeria

Egeria doesn’t produce seed, instead it spreads through fragments breaking off and settling in new sites.

Elodea

Elodea

Elodea is commonly known as Canadian pondweed and spreads through fragments breaking off and settling in new sites.

Hornwort

Hornwort

Floating mats of hornwort can grow to such large sizes that they completely shade out entire areas of lakes.

Koi carp

Koi carp

Look very similar to a goldfish except that they grow to larger sizes and have two pairs of barbels, at the corner of their mouths.

Lagarosiphon

Lagarosiphon

Lagarosiphon is one of the more ‘common’ oxygen weeds, made popular through the aquarium trade.

Marshwort

Marshwort

Marshwort colonises shallow waters, rapidly forming dense mats which cover waterways.

Mexican water lily

Mexican water lily

Introduced to New Zealand as an ornamental pond plant, it forms dense mats of floating leaves over large areas.

Parrots feather

Parrots feather

Originally from South America introduced into New Zealand as part of the aquarium and pond plant trade. 

Perch

Perch

Perch originate from Europe and were introduced to New Zealand as a sports fish in the 1870’s.

Rudd

Rudd

Were illegally imported to New Zealand in 1967, and have been deliberately released progressively throughout the North Island.

sagittaria

Sagittaria

Sagittaria is also known as Arrowhead because of its arrow-shaped leaves.

Senegal Tea

Senegal tea

It was introduced to New Zealand through the ornamental aquatic trade and sold as costata. 

Tench

Tench

Tench are native to Europe and were introduced to New Zealand in 1867 as a sports fish. 

Water poppy

Water poppy

Water poppy grows extremely fast, outcompeting native aquatic plants and quickly forming dense floating mats.

Yellow flag iris

Yellow flag iris

Yellow flag iris is semi aquatic with bright yellow flowers that typically only bloom for a few days.

cleaning gear by a lake in Bay of Plenty

Check, Clean, Dry

Do your bit to help to protect the lakes and rivers you love.

Purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife is a highly aggressive invader of wetlands. It forms massive, tall, thick stands, excluding all other plants.

Californian bulrush

Californian bulrush

Aquatic plant that grows in salt water and forms dense woody, creeping underground root systems.